26 February 2016

As You Are

“I envy people that know love. They have someone who takes them as they are.” ~ Jess C. Scott, The Devilin Fey 
I've been watching couples lately.  I watch how they interact with each other in public, and I listen to stories from friends and even strangers about their relationships.  I am curious about the mechanics of how relationships are supposed to work.  I feel as though my track record with past relationships has not been very good.  Did they all fail because of me?  Did they fail because of the men who I chose? Why have all my relationships failed?  Was I too intense?  Too clingy?  Or was I too distant and not open enough?  

I try hard in any relationship in which I am involved.  With my last relationship, I tried so hard that I felt exhausted and spent at the end of it.  I try everyday, by being supportive, by listening, by rearranging my days and schedule to accommodate theirs, by taking care of them, and by being the person who I believe they want me to be.  

I have spent most of my adult life being a skewed person of myself.  I have contorted myself to be someone else to make others happy, and along the way, I have forgotten who I am inside.

But the "me" inside, the "real" me, wants to come out.  It wants to be seen, to be heard, to be felt, to be needed, to be taken care of... to be loved.  When was the last time someone took care of me? When was the last time someone bent over backwards for me?  I have been so busy twisting and turning myself to take care of others, but they in turn don't do anything to take care of me.

Every day, I see couples on the train, on the streets, in office buildings, and at grocery stores.  I see them holding hands, leaning up against each other, or even kissing.  I look at the faces of these couples, and I examine the smiles on their faces.

The other night, I was at the grocery store.  I walked up on a couple arguing in the parking lot.  "You want to walk, don't you?"  the man said to his wife.  "Ha!" she replied.  "I can't believe you said that. You are so walking." he said. She starts laughing. "Then you're going to have to call my mother and tell her you made me walk home."  They both laughed and he put his arms around her.  As I walked past them, they both smiled at me.  Here was a couple comfortable enough to fight, but yet remain loving and playful with each other.  I felt a tinge of envy.

I deserve that, too.  I deserve to be loved, just as I am, and not have to work so hard at twisting myself into the person others want me to be.  Maybe if I didn't try so hard and just be myself, it might just happen.  

5 comments:

  1. Lessons to learn, a self to love and look after first and foremost but the right love will come. Start with you first x

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  2. This resonates with me. Sometimes, I wonder if it's about the adjustments we make, and the compromises we agree to, or whether it's that we didn't fight more for the space to be our authentic selves. Did they fall for the woman they met or the women the shaped us into? Quite a quandry. Either way, we've learned and grown. As we move forward, only make exception where you are comfortable living with it, and only where you can still recognize your beautiful soul in the mirror. xoxo

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  3. Hi Nova
    Your post provides you with the answer which are maybe to be just yourself and it might just happen. However I do think a long term relationships of any kind inevitably involves adjustments which requires respective ‘’give and take” responses to changed circumstances. In this respect quite often the original gush of warm feelings can break down due to different values emerging under the pressure of changed circumstances.
    So it’s best to try and ascertain respective values from the outset which are supportive to longevity. The public expression of loving responses are not the essence of longevity – in the long term it’s more a matter of mutual respect and seeing the good points and reconciling inevitable differences that will arise along the way.
    Best wishes

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  4. It is wonderful to be loved as we are. I believe that is how we are loved by our children and/or pet dogs. It is unconditional, with innocence and purity. It is sad that as people age, sometimes love changes into something they thought should be beneficial instead of as is. May you find that child-like and pure love, Nova, one that won't change you.

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  5. Anonymous12:36 am

    I learned in my past relationship that it is not good to be yourself. It is good to meet a person halfway or compromise but not at the expense of losing who you are. When we parted ways I felt so much relief and it took time and I felt crumble upon crumble of layers fell of me until I am me again. It felt really good!

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